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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I've had my '07 Subie for about 3 years now, got around 124,000 miles on it. I plan on going on a very long road trip, Washington DC to Dallas, TX and possibly to Los Angeles, about 3500 miles round trip I just wanted to know what maintenance I would need to do before I go. This will be a true test for my subie and I hope nothing bad happens. Got my oil changed about a month ago. Want to know about brake, steering, and transmission fluid. Are they necessary? Someone also mentioned replacing the PCV valve and the spark plugs. Is this something to do before I go or after I return from the trip. Any other maintenance that I should worry about. This is what has been done so far

Oil change - 1 month ago
Coolant flush - about 9 months ago
Brake pads - 6 months ago
transmission, brake, power steering, spark plugs - not since I bought it when it had 70,000 miles

I guess that's it. Any help would be appreciated
 

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Everything can wait until it gets back, but your plugs were due at 120k. Although they do tend to last a lot longer than the 60k recommended change interval.

Have you changed your air filter at 120k? If not, absolutely do that. 10 minutes and better gas mileage.

Have you changed the serpentine belt pulley? This is a very common flaw on the 3.0L engine. Easy to replace, and it will leave you stranded if it goes while on the road.

Here's one of many threads on it: http://www.sb9t.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1266&highlight=serpentine+belt

Also a number over at subaruoutback.org



Here's what I would do:
1) Top off oil
2) Top off coolant (you used subaru long life right? With the conditioner?)
3)Check Auto fluid carefully (need to read how - warm up, shift through gears, etc)
4) Check Front diff level
5) Check air pressure
 

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Also if you battery is older than 5 years, I personally would replace it. A fresh battery could save you from having to get an expensive jump because a suitcase hit the switch in the cargo area and left the light on all night at the hotel. Heat is the enemy of batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My battery is about 2 years old, so should do fine. How do I check auto fluid level, check front diff level? Not sure how to do that.

I'll be changing the air filter and cabin air filter too, as well as refilling my freon for my A/C.

Was wondering if I really needed to replace the serpentine belt pulley if the car sounds fine. IDK, just asking.
 

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2. Automatic Transmission Fluid
A: INSPECTION
NOTE:
The level of ATF varies with fluid temperature. Pay
attention to the ATF temperature when checking
ATF level.
1) Raise the ATF temperature by driving a distance
of 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 miles). Otherwise, idle the engine
to raise ATF temperature to 70 — 80°C (158
— 176°F) on Subaru Select Monitor. <Ref. to
5AT(diag)-15, READ CURRENT DATA, OPERATION,
Subaru Select Monitor.>
2) Park the vehicle on a level surface.
3) After selecting all positions (P, R, N, D), set the
select lever in “P” range. Idle the engine for 1 or 2
minutes, and measure the ATF level.
4) Make sure that the ATF level is between upper
and lower marks of the HOT side.
5) If the ATF level is below the lower mark, add recommended
ATF until the fluid level is between upper
and lower marks.
CAUTION:
• Be careful not to exceed the upper level.
• When the transmission is cold, be careful not
to add ATF to the upper level on HOT side.
Overfilling of ATF may cause oil splashing.
6) Raise the ATF temperature by driving a distance
of 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 miles). Otherwise, idle the engine
to raise ATF temperature to 70 — 80°C (158
— 176°F) on Subaru Select Monitor. <Ref. to
5AT(diag)-15, READ CURRENT DATA, OPERATION,
Subaru Select Monitor.>
7) Check the ATF for leaks.
Visually check for leaks in the transmission. If there
are leaks, replace the gasket, oil seal, plug or other
parts.
 

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3. Differential Gear Oil
A: INSPECTION
1) Park the vehicle on a level surface.
2) Remove the collector cover.
3) Remove the oil level gauge and wipe it clean.
4) Reinsert the level gauge all the way. Make sure
the level gauge is inserted correctly and in the
proper orientation.
5) Remove the oil level gauge again, and check the
level of differential gear oil. If the differential gear oil
level is below “L” line, add oil to bring the level up to
“F” line.
NOTE:
To prevent overfilling the differential gear oil, do not
add oil above the “F” line.

It's on the passenger side of the engine compartment near the rear, down in there. Yellow handle.
 

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Regarding the serpentine belt, I was just pointing out a common issue that could give you problems on the road. It's pretty dead easy to replace. Many people have these fail on the road. I'm not sure if they just ignored the warning signs and kept driving, or if they can fail without much warning.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Better safe than sorry, I'll replace the belt pulley.What about the PCV valve? Mechanic recommended replacing that and spark plugs at 120,000.
 

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Yes, do both the plugs and the PCV. The PCV it's very easy, but it won't affect your long drive this summer. It just allows oil back in to the intake and can cause carbon build up over a long time (years).
 

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Hi there, first time posting on here. My wife's 06 Tribeca limited never had the 60k maintenance done on it and we are just at 88k miles now.

Here is what was done in the last 6 months.
Front and rear differential fluid drain and refill.
New battery.
Coolant drain and refill.
Replaced serpentine pulley and belt (it blew up and shredded the belt while driving down the highway so we obviously had to replace it right away). EDIT: I replaced the belt only 6 months prior to it failing. So I went through two belts and one pulley in less than a year.

Here is what I am doing later this week.
Replacing sway bar links and bushings (getting the clunking sound from the front end).
Drain and refill transmission fluid using Subaru OE replacement fluid.

What else should I be doing at this mileage and in preparation for the next 15-20k miles? Any recommended parts replacement or fluids that need to be changed soon that I'm missing? From what I've read I shouldn't be worried about the timing chain or water pump for a while at least.
 

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According to the FSM, at
60k: replace oil/filter, coolant, spark plugs, air filter, brake fluid and cabin air filter (if equipped).
90k: same as 60k except for spark plugs
105: replace serpentine belt
120k: same as 60k

Since you've already changed (or are going to change) the diff fluid, serpentine, coolant and ATF, all that's really left is the brake fluid and plugs and you should probably be good for the next 30k miles. If you're ambitious, it probably wouldn't hurt to replace the PS fluid in the reservoir if you have any leftover ATF (since the OE stuff is combo ATF/PS fluid).

Unless you're already going under the chain cover for something else (e.g. head gaskets, oil pump, valve adjustment, etc.), timing chains/guides/tensioners and water pump are not necessary unless you're having specific problems with those components.

Those sway bar links are a PITA... don't be shy with the penetrating oil. Let us know if the bushings get rid of the clunk.
 

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I agree, you need air filter, spark plugs for sure.

Consider brake fluid and PCV valve.

Inspect brake pads and don't ignore a squeal that shows up suddenly. The wear indicator often brakes off shortly after hitting.

Tom
 

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Well I finally got around to replacing the sway bar links last weekend. The process was a bit easier than I thought it would be. It was pretty well rusted, but the nuts broke free pretty easily. Getting to the nut on the outside between the tire and brake roter was the hardest part. The bushings were pretty well shot and there was a lot of play between the bolt and the bushing. This only fixed part of the clunking sound though.

After replacing the sway bar links the metal-on-metal clinking sound is gone, but there is still a knocking when going over rough roads. I'm guess I have a bad strut now at this point as both front sway bar links, bushings, and control arm bushings have been replaced now. Any other ideas what could be causing the clunking or is it most likely the struts?

Also, I usually do replace the air filter every 2nd or 3rd oil change, so that gets done at least twice a year. I'll have to bleed the brake fluid and refill next I think. Thanks for the suggestions!
 

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Play between bolt and bushing?

Just to be clear, the bushing we are talking about are two U shaped pushings that fit around the bar itself, near the front of the bar? Those are the most likely cause. Make sure you got the correct part number from subaru.

Then go after the struts.
 

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maintenance

i am at 90k miles just changed both differentials fluid used Valvoline Sinpower 75w90 did an oil change too used Shell formula full synth 5w30 and oem filter ,replaced pcv as well ,also did both valve cover gaskets ,the tensioner , idler and belt i replaced at 80k along with ATF ,coolant and thermostat i used Peak Global Lifetime , did the plugs at 70k installed Denso iridium long life while doing that one of my coils connectors tabs broke i was able to buy one online .also replace both wiper blades refills 20" short one p/n SOA591U320R 26" driver side p/n SOA591U326R less than $10 for both :D :tup:
 

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i am at 90k miles just changed both differentials fluid used Valvoline Sinpower 75w90 did an oil change too used Shell formula full synth 5w30 and oem filter ,replaced pcv as well ,also did both valve cover gaskets ,the tensioner , idler and belt i replaced at 80k along with ATF ,coolant and thermostat i used Peak Global Lifetime , did the plugs at 70k installed Denso iridium long life while doing that one of my coils connectors tabs broke i was able to buy one online .also replace both wiper blades refills 20" short one p/n SOA591U320R 26" driver side p/n SOA591U326R less than $10 for both :D :tup:
Is there a reason that you used the OEM filter?
 

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Subaru OEM filter is best as the bypass valve opening pressure seems to be hard to match in the aftermarket. Any you can buy them for reasonable prices on ebay.

Some have reported oil pressure issues related to valve timing with aftermarket filters.

Probably isn't going to blow up your engine...

Tom
 

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Napa/Wix and Purolator advertise the correct bypass pressures, unlike FRAM. I personally use NAPA gold on my vehicles when they have deals as they're the best value.
 

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I was going to tell you about that on our PM, but didn't want to overwhelm you with too much because you have alot going on at the same time. I wouldn't be horribly concerned about non OEM THIS time, but I'd get an OEM filter via ebay if I were you.

This is for the Forester, but the *why* (bypass PSI info) is in these threads.

http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/f113/subaru-oil-filter-comparison-99130/

If you are looking to get creative with maintenance parts, it is MUCH harder to do in the Subaru world IMO so be careful. IMO they have just about as much of a monopoly on their parts as Comcast has on internet service.

I save ingenuity on maintenance items for my other vehicles, and trust me I am one cheap bastard. :)
 

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2. Automatic Transmission Fluid
A: INSPECTION
NOTE:
The level of ATF varies with fluid temperature. Pay
attention to the ATF temperature when checking
ATF level.
1) Raise the ATF temperature by driving a distance
of 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 miles). Otherwise, idle the engine
to raise ATF temperature to 70 — 80°C (158
— 176°F) on Subaru Select Monitor. <Ref. to
5AT(diag)-15, READ CURRENT DATA, OPERATION,
Subaru Select Monitor.>
2) Park the vehicle on a level surface.
3) After selecting all positions (P, R, N, D), set the
select lever in “P” range. Idle the engine for 1 or 2
minutes, and measure the ATF level.
4) Make sure that the ATF level is between upper
and lower marks of the HOT side.
5) If the ATF level is below the lower mark, add recommended
ATF until the fluid level is between upper
and lower marks.
CAUTION:
• Be careful not to exceed the upper level.
• When the transmission is cold, be careful not
to add ATF to the upper level on HOT side.
Overfilling of ATF may cause oil splashing.
6) Raise the ATF temperature by driving a distance
of 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 miles). Otherwise, idle the engine
to raise ATF temperature to 70 — 80°C (158
— 176°F) on Subaru Select Monitor. <Ref. to
5AT(diag)-15, READ CURRENT DATA, OPERATION,
Subaru Select Monitor.>
7) Check the ATF for leaks.
Visually check for leaks in the transmission. If there
are leaks, replace the gasket, oil seal, plug or other
parts.
These should be stickied
 
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