Subaru B9 Trifecta SUV Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today after moving in the driveway, I noted some fluids on the snow that are yellow. Not quite the yellow green as antifreeze. It was in the rear diff area.

I'm new to Subaru's, and assume this isn't good.

'06 7p Ltd, 37k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Same thing here. Just moved my B9T and found yellow snow. Looks like a leak from the rear axle area. Anybody ever see this other than ne0031?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I've had the same thing happen. I have an 06 Tribeca and I noticed it more when the car was newer. Haven't seen it as much the past couple winters, but it was also yellow/gold color and I am convinced it's a leak since it happened multiple times, but haven't been able to pinpoint it. Also, I never notice anything in dry/non-snow conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I called the closest dealership to my location and the Tech informed me that there were no fluids of that color in the vehicle. After some investigating, I am fairly certain there is no leak.

1. The stuff that was dripping was coming off of the exhaust pipe under the car and around the transmission.

2. This was the first time I had driven in snow deeper than the underside of the vehicle.

3. There was still snow up under the vehicle which was melting as the car warmed up.

4. I took her for a spin and let the snow melt off.

5. After driving around for a bit, the snow melted off and there were no drips.

6. After several days driving around town and parking on a packed snow driveway I did not see any more leaks.

7. Since I had never driven in snow that was higher than the footwell before and there wasn't anything dripping before or since, I concluded there wasn't a leak and whatever caused this was from the melting snow rinsing something off of the underside of the vehicle.

8. I was bummed because it was a powder day and it delayed my departure for the mountain.

9. Thumbs up to the Tech who did some troubleshooting on the phone that day in VT on a day when it dumped 2.5 feet of snow. Where I live, everything shuts down if there is as much as an inch of snow.

10. Still have no drips so I am happy about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
That's interesting and it makes sense. I'll have to keep a better eye on it next time we get significant snow. I always thought it was a brake fluid leak because that was the fluid I knew of to be closest in color to what I found in the snow, but I was never low on the brake fluid. I kind of forgot about it until I saw this post because it wasn't as frequent, and I've never seen a leak that fixed itself! So hopefully it is just off the exhaust pipe. Thanks for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
With the blizzard in New England, I found those gold drops in the snow under my Tribeca, but I also noticed them under my wife's new Outback. I closely looked at them and they did have dirt mixed in, so I do agree about it coming off the exhaust pipe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
The muffler "can" usually has a small hole at the bottom on the forward-facing flat side. This is to drain the condensate and prevent rusting from the inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
apexi said:
I had it too, after dropping the lower engine cover and not finding anything leaking I thought it might be the neighbors dog.

Here is the info from the link above that explains it.

95 per cent of the exhaust systems built today are made up of iron alloy and galvanized steel. Exhaust pipes are made of either iron or stainless steel. Heat shields are made of galvanized steel. Here's where Mr. Podominocov would be giving me a gold star: galvanized steel uses zinc as a rust inhibiter.

Zinc, when hot and in the presence of iron and a catalyst, creates yellow zinc oxide in the form of crystals. The connection is the catalyst - salt water - or compacted snow with road salt mixed in. If the snow is able to touch the exhaust heat shields and the exhaust pipes at the same time, the chemical reaction between the two dissimilar metals creates the bright yellow crystals.

(see the June 18, 2010 blog for more).

As the hot exhaust pipe(s) melt the snow, the yellow substance drops to the snow covered ground - causing much consternation.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top