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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bf8uRTjfxsk

The video takes less than 1/2 hour, but I needed almost 6 hours. (Including short periods of cussing, considerable clean-up of splattered grease from the blown boot, brake pad replacement on both sides, and several beers). :lol:

His method avoids draining diff fluid, and my concurrent brake job also avoided opening the brake line. The only fluid replacement was CV axle grease (I used Redline CV2, filling up the joint only about half way. I think the mixture with soggy old gray stuff will be harmless, though I might be wrong about that. I imagine that I'll hear or feel trouble if the mixture was a bad idea, before anything catastrophic occurs.)

I also used after-market "clip into one of the holes" boot clamps, instead of keeping the originals. On the passenger side, the narrow clamp had become loose over time, allowing a small amount grease to leak out around the axle. I didn't replace that boot, which looked good - I only replaced the clamp. My "loose ends, clip into a hole" type avoided any need to take the passenger side joint apart. Note to self: after a few hundred miles, check all clamps and re-tighten if they've stretched enough to reach into the next hole.

Because I was doing brake pads on both sides, I took the tires off - and that gives you a better view anyway. Before starting, alignment was good. So, I carefully noted the upper strut tower bolt position (a bit past the 4th mark). That's the bolt with the bevel/flange in it, adjusting camber. I also marked both nut positions with a dental scratch tool.

Work was otherwise uneventful, although I needed to tap the 3-cylinder CV joint with a screwdriver and hammer to get it off of the axle, and also to get it back on (screwdriver down next to the axle shaft, NOT up on one of the 3 cylinders). I also used quite a few paper towels to clean up the mess of grease from the cracked CV.

My axle assembly parts (model year 2007) were identical to the parts on the Outback he worked on. The test drive seemed really nice.
RRR.....not looking forward to this at all! Going to do it this way. Just finished doing this on my FXT and on the passenger side as well. At least there is some support for doing it on this model as there was none on my early FXT.

I don't want to lose my fresh gear fluid. Needed to use a bearing separator to get the inside apart. I also packed with Redline CV2 on the FXT and have enough left over.

If anyone is doing this with OEM clamps, don't let the dealer sell you their variety of clamp...make sure it's an OEM. My oetiker tool only worked on the OEM clamp forcing me to take an additional 2 hours to rebend my stocker!
 

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I know this thread is pretty stale and old, but im trying to wrap my brain around the procedure im used to roll pin subie axles. does the c clip retainment require a slide hammer to pop the axle out and am i reading correctly the c clip pops out a lot or is it the retaining spring on the axle seal. also what is the part number for the axle seal....... and i keep seeing it advised to not break the axle bolt on the ground or it may damage the wheel bearing, how does it do this, I was assuming on doing it on the ground but with the brakes depressed to break it off
 

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1. No slide hammer needed, just a good tug. Worst case, something between the axle cup and the transmission to pop it out.
2. c clip has never been left in the transmission for me. I've done 3. Retaining spring of axle seal did come out on 2
3. Replaced the axle seal on the last one because the 2nd one did leak small amount. parts.subaru.com for part number, they are right and left side specific. I would just go to the dealer and get it there.
4. Yes, jack up car, pull wheel, put a board from the brake to the power seat, move the power seat forward to depress brake, loosen nut. Factory Service Manual has warning in it that the bearing can be damaged if you loosen the nut on the ground (weight on it that will spread the bearing). Doing it on ground with brake will still have doesn't solve this issue.
 

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i think i may just tackle the boots rather than the whole cv axle, its the inner boots and the joint still seems very good I caught it reasonably quick so I have ordered subaru oem boots and some swepco 101 cv grease, I am going to pull the inners apart on the vehicle and clean em regrease them and reboot while on the vehicle. I will let you know how it goes......
 

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I had bad experience with Febest CV boot kit off Amazon. The boot was good, but the clamps were like 2mm off. We had the axle on the bench and a good cv boot clamp. We could not get that clamp to latch. Ended up getting ace hardware clamps. Damn was I pissed at the time.
 

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ok, just seems way too tight to try and re boot the inner on the vehicle so i pulled the axle, sneezed as i was removing the c clip of the tri bearing race and lord knows i cant find the c clip anyone have a part number

m20 or m22 c clip works fine, all went well dare I say its easier then roll pin subie axles, i did pull them to reboot and im glad I did as it allowed me to clean everything up far better. I used oem boots and I used swepco 101 moly grease on em, all went well and threw some motul 300 gear oil in the diffs while i was greasy.
 

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Just did both inner boots on my 08 this weekend.

Took about 3 hours for both.

Did ball joint method. One side easy, one side I had to pry a bit harder on the LCA.

Replaced oil seals in transmission as I've destroyed them before removing the axle.

Taking the joint apart was simple enough.

Tom
 

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that's why everyone is rebuilding them rather than paying the 500. your fooling yourself if you think a 50 axle is going to even be close to the OEM quality. You can pull your OEM axles and if you're not up for the job find a local place to rebuild them for you. But I certainly hope you're not trading in your quality OEM axles as a core for the cheap chinesium axles. I have owned 8 Subarus over the years and changed scads of cv axles fords toyotas hondas subaru are tougher on cv axles than any of them. I have went the cheap aftermarket route and had boots and joints blow out in less than a year. You have to put the labor of actually doing the job into the mix as well I definitely don't want to be digging into the front end again within the year. You are right though 1000 is a bitter pill to swallow, which is why I rebuilt 15 months going strong still .....this isnt my first cv axle rebuild however.
 

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My tribeca had a bad shimmy at 40-60 mph. Finally traced it to the aftermarket axle. Got a used axle from a junker and rebooted it. Shimmy went away.

Usually problem with subarus is a vibration at idle when tranmission is in park and foot on brake. So I was surprised when I determined it was the axle and the replacement actually fixed it.
 

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So repair is complete. I did trade the $500 OEM axle for the new $50 Rock Auto. All operations seem good. No vibrations, no awkwardness on tight slow speed circles. Now will this last another 140k miles, I think so, but it sounds like others do not. It's the wife's care she says its driving great, and will continue to say that until its broken on the side of the road. But even I cannot discern anything wrong with new Rock Auto. I am happy.

We gotta realize that these cars at this point are worth $4k, and the argument of "cheap chinesium axles" does not hold. Give me a break, Subaru's are price point cars to begin with, they were not build with Space Age metals.

In some ways I wish I had ridden the torn boots longer. Only one was really torn bad enough that the grease had escaped. I should have waited for play or grinding, because we've all had cars we've done significant preemptive repairs only to then sell the car or something. Additionally I will acknowledge that I am heeding your advice. I have the OEMs stored, and should my rock autos start acting up i can take them to be rebuilt and reinstall.
 

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You will be fine. The rock auto versions have long shown to be good for subarus largely, with a few failing via the vibration. That's the only real concern and it shows up immediately on install.
 

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So I need to tackle this job. Passenger side boot is torn and has been for several months. I can sometimes feel vibration when accelerating from a stop. I assume this means my axle needs to be rebuilt.

Can someone point me to a thread on this? I assume it isn't as simple as pulling the joint and rollers and replacing with new. I did watch the video above where the guy replaces his boot while leaving the cup attached to the tranny. That looks like a nice way to go, but I don't know if replacing that joint and the three rollers will fix the vibration issue. If so, that looks like a piece of cake.

This vehicle is a 2008 with 198k on the odometer. It is still my DD, but I want to keep it when I get a new vehicle to use as my dirt hunting vehicle. Should I just buy the $50 RockAuto axle, or is "rebuilding" the axle pretty easy?
 

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15k Miles Later

Rock Auto Shafts still functioning as per the OEM.

I'll apply that $1000 to the next car I buy, but actually I'll invest the 1000, and in this Pres. Donald Trump economy, it will probably be $2000 when I go to buy our next car!
 

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Rebooting factory axles is the way to go. If someone lets the car run with torn boots till the joint wears out (which takes quite a while), then $50 axles are just right for them.
 
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