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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

First time on this site. I appreciate all that you are doing. I really need some help. It's going to be a 100+ degrees, here in Arizona for a while. Of course, my blower fan quit working in my 2006 Tribeca. I have taken the fan out and hooked it up directly to a the battery. It works perfectly. There is 11.8 Volts getting to it from the plug. When I turn on the fan mode in the vehicle, the fan works for about about a second, then stops. It doesn't work whether the A/C is on or not. Anybody have a solution for this issue? I would really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance for your time and efforts.

Sincerely,
Rugo
 

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When you press the AUTO button, does the fan work normally in that mode?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. No, the fan just comes on for about 1 second, when I select auto or just on. No matter what the fan setting is. Low up to high. Also have checked all of the fuses that I think are related. It was working fine for about the first two miles of my comute to work. Then the fan just stopped.

Thanks again for your time and efforts.

Rugo
 

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Since you're getting 11.8v to the blower and you've confirmed the blower works via the battery, it sounds like either a bad transistor or control unit.

There's a self-diagnostic procedure in the FSM... Not sure if it's going to be of any help at this point, but I'll look it up and try to post a link tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just printed the diagnostic pages. Have to go work now. Have the next couple of days off. Will make good use of them.

Thanks for your help.

Rugo
 

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Also note the troubleshooting procedure on pg 10... no reference is made in the flowchart to the blower transistor listed in the diagram on pg. 9, but my experience with blower motors that are otherwise operable but don't seem to run properly is usually due to the blower motor resistor being bad. A blown resistor typically means you have either two fan speeds - high & off - or nothing at all.

Here, it's a little bit different... the front blower has a transistor instead of a resistor since the fan speed is controlled electronically. It would appear that the transistor serves the same purpose as the resistor: control the fan speed by changing the current to the blower. So regardless of whether or not the transistor or resistor is bad, if you're getting any voltage at all, it should be the battery voltage. So if you're getting 11.8v, it may seem like everything should be fine, when it may be the case that you're not getting enough amperage to start or keep the fan running.

That said, the transistor regulates current based on the signal it receives from the control unit, which means you could have a good transistor but a bad control unit. Or you could - and hopefully this is the case - simply have a bad wire/connection between the control unit and transistor. Since your voltage appears to be correct, you can probably rule out the possibility of bad wiring/connection between the transistor and blower.

Testing the wiring harness/connections is probably the easiest possibility to troubleshoot. Trying to troubleshoot whether you have a bad transistor or control unit is a completely different story... that might be a job for the dealership unless you have experience with microelectronics.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the great info. I plan to work on it again, tomorrow. I really appreciate all of the information that you passed along to me. Hope to get something figured out soon. Not fun to drive around in 110 to 115 degrees, without any AC.

Thanks again,
Rugo
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just wanted to let those who were interested, that the issue turned out to be the blower motor transistor/resistor. Fortunately, it wasn't the controller. Even though the transistor/resistor is around a $100, the controller is over 3 times that much. I really appreciate the help and advice that I received. So, I wanted to share what I found out. Hopefully, it will help somebody that may be, or will have this same issue. After all, that is what these forums are for.

Thank you again for all of your time and efforts.

Sincerely,
Rugo
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bammo,

Sorry to hear that your A/C has given out right in the middle of summer. The answer to your question, is "YES", I did replace it myself. It is on the passenger side interior firewall. Isn't much to it, as long as you are a little limber and have some basic metric tools. Hopefully it is the the resistor. The controller is about 3 times more expensive. I checked to see how much it would cost to have a shop diagnose it. It was about the same price as the resistor. So, I took a chance that it was the issue. If it wasn't, and I had to buy the controller, I would have spent the same as I would have, if I had paid to have it diagnosed. I have found that parts for a B9 Tribeca, are about the same price or lower at the Subaru dealership. I think that they are trying to move some obsolete parts. You probably have already checked into it though. Hopefully this info help you. Good luck with your issue.

Rugo
 

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Yes, it’s bad timing, especially since I live in Florida. Have you had to replace your A/C blower? I watched a YouTube video that said when the blower resistor goes bad, the blower is usually not far behind; therefore, it’s best to replace both at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bammo,

No,so far the blower is working fine. I guess ignorance is bliss. However, now that you told me, it will probably go out. Thanks a lot. LOL!. When I was originally trying to diagnose the issue, I took my blower fan out and hooked it directly to my battery. The thing about flew out of my hand. It seemed to be very strong still. With that said, most of the driving I did with my Tribeca, was up in the Western side of the State of Washington. The temperatures are much milder than they are here in Arizona and where you are in Florida. Perhaps my blower fan will give up someday. I remember finding a rather inexpensive one that fit, at Autozone. But, as I mentioned in my last post, I have found that Subaru is very competitive with their Tribeca parts pricing. Pretty sure, they want to get rid of a the parts to a vehicle that they no longer manufacture. Whatever the reason, I would buy the Genuine Subaru part over they others, if the price was comparable. For instance, I just had to replace my heater intake hose. It was leaking pretty badly. The aftermarket hose, at Autozone was $45 and change. The Genuine Subaru part, at the dealership was just barely over $20. Same for the O ring gasket for the transmission oil cooler. The price was almost exactly the same as an aftermarket on Amazon. Hope this info helps. Sounds like you are on your way to getting the issue fixed. Probably wouldn't hurt anything if you replaced your blower fan while your there. Well, except your wallet. Preventative maintenance is always a good thing, if you have the means.

Good Luck,
Steve
 

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I went to the grocery store a little while ago, and on my way back I turned on the A/C and it worked. That is, it blew. 🤪. So now I’m not sure what the problem is. I’m just going to wait and see what happens. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. I’ll keep you posted. Thanks for all of the info!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bammo,

Well, that's good news. Hopefully it will continue to run. You may look at all of the connections. In my experience, if something electrical works intermittently, it the most simple reason is there is a bad connect. Just a bump in the road, or slamming the door of your vehicle can cause the connection to move. It would be nice if that is all it is. But, who knows with all of these electrical components on our modern day cars. I like my 1953 Chevrolet Truck. If it isn't running. It can only be about 3 things. Pretty easy to diagnose. Good luck and keep us all posted.

Rugo
 

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Yeah, that‘s what I was thinking, i.e., a loose wire. Agree the old vehicles were easier to diagnose. A mechanic could just listen to your car and tell you what the problem is. Now you have to pay $75 for a computer to diagnose it. Again, thanks for the info and your input.
 
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