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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up some sti rims from a 2009 sti

I need new tires already for the tribeca
I drive maybe 7miles to and from work and I wanted to get some more meat on my tires.

I plan to lift my Tribeca about 1' inch all around.
Do you think something in the
260/55? Would work?
 

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whats the offset?
i dont think 260/55/18 even exists as regular tire size.

im running a 30" tire now but a bit narrower with stock height, i have no issues,

if you got the ones with 55mm offset (7mm closer to the strut), since its .5" wider then your are lost about 13.5mm of inside space even with stock tires, so going wider might be tricky
how do you plan on lifting it? if you are serious then lift it, measure the space gained and go from there to choose a tire.

willtheyfit.com is a good visualizer for you
 

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The stock size is a pretty big tire already, I would go narrower and taller if anything. Like a 245/65/18. What may limit you is the space between the spring perch and tire/wheel. Check that out too.
 

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Lifting a multi-link Subaru is a fairly involved process. I can get away with 0.5" all around without making any other changes on the OB but I am not sure that the TB can even handle that. The issues are alignment (above 0.5") and position of the wheel in the wheel well (strut spacers push the rear wheel quite a bit forward, about 3/8s I think for my 0.5" spacers on the OB). Thus a rear subframe drop is required to address those issues.

On the OB, I am going 2" soon but that is because I drive it on 4x4 trails. Even so, I resisted going beyond 0.5" for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys for the all help.


I wonder if a 245/65/18 would work on the stock ride height



And what kind of tires are you guys running?
This is my daily but I like to hit some off road trails ones in a while
 

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Thanks guys for the all help.


I wonder if a 245/65/18 would work on the stock ride height



And what kind of tires are you guys running?
This is my daily but I like to hit some off road trails ones in a while
Well, now we are talking!

I have driven the stock B9 in Southern Utah in bad weather conditions and it handled mud up to the rocker panel very well with TC off (or it will stop within a few yards). I used Sumitomo sport tires first and Toyo Open Country ATII later. The ATII were superb on dirt but in mud it was all the same (clogged quickly) since they are not mud-terrain. All in all I put around 800 unpaved miles on it, lots of them in rougher terrain than just well-maintained dry dirt roads but none that qualifies as a 4x4 trail in dry weather.

The Tribeca can also do very well in sand so long as it has a tiny bit of air between sand and underbody (TC off again).

But the Tribeca will struggle in any rocks above half a foot. The front bumper is even worse than the OB's and the rocker panel clearance is hopeless.

We now use Nitto 420S tires on the 2008 TB. We have had them for almost 20k. So far, they have remained quiet (these are sporty tires). Their performance has been terrific. The car corners and stops extremely well in my opinion. Another good tire is the Nitto 421Q. It will last longer and be less noisy when it ages than the 420S but probably not quite as good in terms of performance.

If you really do go on bumpy trails, you will, as you well know, prefer 17" wheels and beefier tires. I would stay away from LT tires (I have KO2s on the OB and like them a lot but for heavy duty only) unless frequent airing down for sand is expected. I am not sure what models are available in 17" for the TB because its tires are much wider than the OBs.

I would start from looking into the brand new AT offerings: the Yokohama GO15 and the Continental Terrain Contact AT. Still a great fan of the Toyo AT II but they did get loud at 20k.
 

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i ran 0.5" front and 1" rear spacers with no problems in alignment, and with a taller tire 235/70/17, ET45, the only reason i pulled them is there is no rubbing with larger tires that i wasn't sure about originally.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, now we are talking!

I have driven the stock B9 in Southern Utah in bad weather conditions and it handled mud up to the rocker panel very well with TC off (or it will stop within a few yards). I used Sumitomo sport tires first and Toyo Open Country ATII later. The ATII were superb on dirt but in mud it was all the same (clogged quickly) since they are not mud-terrain. All in all I put around 800 unpaved miles on it, lots of them in rougher terrain than just well-maintained dry dirt roads but none that qualifies as a 4x4 trail in dry weather.

The Tribeca can also do very well in sand so long as it has a tiny bit of air between sand and underbody (TC off again).

But the Tribeca will struggle in any rocks above half a foot. The front bumper is even worse than the OB's and the rocker panel clearance is hopeless.

We now use Nitto 420S tires on the 2008 TB. We have had them for almost 20k. So far, they have remained quiet (these are sporty tires). Their performance has been terrific. The car corners and stops extremely well in my opinion. Another good tire is the Nitto 421Q. It will last longer and be less noisy when it ages than the 420S but probably not quite as good in terms of performance.

If you really do go on bumpy trails, you will, as you well know, prefer 17" wheels and beefier tires. I would stay away from LT tires (I have KO2s on the OB and like them a lot but for heavy duty only) unless frequent airing down for sand is expected. I am not sure what models are available in 17" for the TB because its tires are much wider than the OBs.

I would start from looking into the brand new AT offerings: the Yokohama GO15 and the Continental Terrain Contact AT. Still a great fan of the Toyo AT II but they did get loud at 20k.

thank you so much for this info, ya over here in California there is a little to no snow or really mud just some small off trails. so I really want some all terian tires I'm gonna look into those you said.

i ran 0.5" front and 1" rear spacers with no problems in alignment, and with a taller tire 235/70/17, ET45, the only reason i pulled them is there is no rubbing with larger tires that i wasn't sure about originally.
what spacer are you running? I only found some on ebay.

and are your 235/70/17 on the stock rim?






and what do you guys think about a skid plate?
I was really thinking of getting one
 

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Spacers i made myself, nothing crazy or good looking, HDPE plastic works well.

and no 17" tires don't fit on stock rims, look in my ride thread there is some info on different setups i used.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Spacers i made myself, nothing crazy or good looking, HDPE plastic works well.

and no 17" tires don't fit on stock rims, look in my ride thread there is some info on different setups i used.
I would love some spacer ;) if you sell them I wouldn't mind a bigger lift.


I'm still on what tire to get all terrain or all season.
 

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Personally, I would much rather have a new design AT with some minimal loss of on-road ability compared to really good street tires than worry about any street tires on unpaved roads. But I would only get a new design AT tires, not old designs like the Geolander ATS. Also, going down to 17" wheels will greatly enhance the ride over unpaved roads.



Street tires can get the job done in many cases but it all depends on the terrain and the frequency of use. Also, they better have a lot of life left in them when on trail.



I have done a bunch of long rough unpaved roads/easy trails on street tires but just a few hundred miles of such roads made the tires age a great deal. They were chipping and constantly clogging with small stones. Once, when they were closing on 30k total mileage they refused to make the car move on an actual desert trail, at an eroded uphill spot. After that deflating episode, I went with all terrain and have not looked back.

In addition, with AT tires one does not have to constantly sweat all the rocks, especially on desert trails (but do not run P-metric ATs aired down much unless really necessary).

Much depends on where in California you are and what you mean by light trails. Coastal and forest roads would be one story while rarely maintained desert trails are a whole different ball game. AZ and CA desert terrain can be extremely harsh. All desert trails (actual trails, not the many wide maintained desert dirt roads), whether easy or hardcore, present an incessant mixture of sharp rocks and sand plus steep wash entries/exits which make them extremely tiring for me in a Subaru.


If the trails you have in mind are officially labelled 4WD HC only, I would not personally consider them TB suitable. The TB is noticeably worse than an OB or a Foz in terms of clearance in crucial places (especially rocker panel and a front bumper even worse than an OB's). "High-clearance recommended" are way milder roads than 4WD HC only ones. For me, just looking at my OB with its modest 0.9" total lift next to the stock TB in my garage is enough to tell the story.


In terms of guides, I really like Massey's. He has several California guides. They are old and many of his 4+ rated trails may be harder now (and a few should be better as sometimes even hard trails get graded) but the lower rated trails are maintained regularly so they should be the same. I am no fan of the Wells series. They are much newer but his guides are much better suited to Wranglers, 4Runners trail, and XTerra Pro-4X than to Subarus or general purpose 4x4s. And he has gone even more hardcore with his latest editions. In addition, Wells rates all trails in just three categories which makes it extremely hard to judge a trail from a stock Subaru perspective.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Personally, I would much rather have a new design AT with some minimal loss of on-road ability compared to really good street tires than worry about any street tires on unpaved roads. But I would only get a new design AT tires, not old designs like the Geolander ATS. Also, going down to 17" wheels will greatly enhance the ride over unpaved roads.



Street tires can get the job done in many cases but it all depends on the terrain and the frequency of use. Also, they better have a lot of life left in them when on trail.



I have done a bunch of long rough unpaved roads/easy trails on street tires but just a few hundred miles of such roads made the tires age a great deal. They were chipping and constantly clogging with small stones. Once, when they were closing on 30k total mileage they refused to make the car move on an actual desert trail, at an eroded uphill spot. After that deflating episode, I went with all terrain and have not looked back.

In addition, with AT tires one does not have to constantly sweat all the rocks, especially on desert trails (but do not run P-metric ATs aired down much unless really necessary).

Much depends on where in California you are and what you mean by light trails. Coastal and forest roads would be one story while rarely maintained desert trails are a whole different ball game. AZ and CA desert terrain can be extremely harsh. All desert trails (actual trails, not the many wide maintained desert dirt roads), whether easy or hardcore, present an incessant mixture of sharp rocks and sand plus steep wash entries/exits which make them extremely tiring for me in a Subaru.


If the trails you have in mind are officially labelled 4WD HC only, I would not personally consider them TB suitable. The TB is noticeably worse than an OB or a Foz in terms of clearance in crucial places (especially rocker panel and a front bumper even worse than an OB's). "High-clearance recommended" are way milder roads than 4WD HC only ones. For me, just looking at my OB with its modest 0.9" total lift next to the stock TB in my garage is enough to tell the story.


In terms of guides, I really like Massey's. He has several California guides. They are old and many of his 4+ rated trails may be harder now (and a few should be better as sometimes even hard trails get graded) but the lower rated trails are maintained regularly so they should be the same. I am no fan of the Wells series. They are much newer but his guides are much better suited to Wranglers, 4Runners trail, and XTerra Pro-4X than to Subarus or general purpose 4x4s. And he has gone even more hardcore with his latest editions. In addition, Wells rates all trails in just three categories which makes it extremely hard to judge a trail from a stock Subaru perspective.

Wow thank you so much for this info this helps out a lot.
I would only go to Azusa canyon trials but maybe I'm living the dream thinking the TB can go over the place .

Maybe I'll just stick with regular all season tires then.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just to let everyone know I mounted 260/65/18 on the STI rims and they fit perfect, did rub a small amount on the front fender liner, but I didn't take the tires since I will be doing a lot of off road trails, I'm gonna end up getting some stock 255/55/18 on my 2009 STI rims and just put some all terrain tires on there, just trying to find the best price for them
 

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Just to let everyone know I mounted 260/65/18 on the STI rims and they fit perfect, did rub a small amount on the front fender liner, but I didn't take the tires since I will be doing a lot of off road trails, I'm gonna end up getting some stock 255/55/18 on my 2009 STI rims and just put some all terrain tires on there, just trying to find the best price for them
Thanks for the info.

There are two problems with 255 55 18 for AT tires that frustrated me a lot back in the day. First, when you air down this size tire for a real sand situation, like a deep sand beach or desert trail, there is very little sidewall left. I mean, looks like a pancake. Second, the prices are awful. I think this is so because 255 55 18 is a relatively rare size shared with luxury cars.

If I were seriously considering off-roading a Tribeca again, I would look into 17" wheels and whatever tire size would be appropriate. A quick search found me this:
http://www.onlinetires.com/user/vehicle/tires/falken/asc/all_sizes/all_tires/all_speeds/page_1.html which is a well regarded tire for grip. This is a great price. By contrast the Toyo AT II that I liked so much are nearly 200 (in 255 55 18). This site used to get complaints about delivery but if you can drive to the LA area, you could simply pick them up. There even seems to be a mud terrain tire in this size! If my memory is right, this Maxxis model is a highly regarded one, I could imagine myself pairing this with a set of 18" wheels and sporty tires for DD.
http://www.onlinetires.com/products/vehicle/tires/maxxis/255%252F65-17+maxxis+mt-762+bighorn++owl.html

There is, of course, a catch with 17" wheels: they must be strong enough for the TB. While reputable sites like TireRack only offer wheels that meet the 1/4 of GVWR requirement, I would personally want wheels that are much more in line with the strength of stock wheels, which seems to be a lot more than just 1/4 of GVWR (but Subaru does not publish it; they told my dealer to look at the tire load rating for orientation and that rating is a lot more than 1/4 of GVWR). The reason you want strong wheels is partly because in some situations most of the weight will be on only one axle.

Anyway. You know best what will work for you. I am just happy for the opportunity to share what I have learned from my TB experiences since barely anyone takes TBs off-pavement.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ya I love the Tribeca, I did find the Toyo open country at2 for $760 mounted and balanced for the 255/55/18 since I already had the 18x8.5 STI rims I don't want to purchase any other rim
 

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I can see that. A set of wheels costs money, eats space, and is a pain to put on and take off for weekend trips (mine tend to be fewer but longer).

I hope you will enjoy the ATII. For me, it was a revelation. The only issue I ever had was when the tires were brand new. The protective chemical layer seems to have been so thick that the car felt like on skates for about 50-100 miles, lol. I was even a little alarmed but it was all good after those first miles.

I would avoid airing them down unless really necessary, like really deep sand. I have done all my Utah mud driving on street pressures on both my street tires and the AT II. Their two-ply sidewalls and the 55 ratio are not really well suited to lower pressures. OTOH, if the sand looks really bad, airing down ahead of time is still necessary. But for large and stubborn rocks covered by dirt I would not air down proactively.

Now with the LT-metric KO2s on the OB, I have been forced to put up with the 4x4 air-down/ air-up ritual because 1/street pressure is 45 and 2/the KO2 has no issues with lower pressures. So I will have to upgrade my air compressor...
 
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