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Old 03-07-2016, 09:10 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Tackling brakes this weekend

I haven't done brakes on the B9 since my wife has owned it so I have a few questions before I dive into it.

I understand jacking points are the same as pretty much every Subaru (I have a Forester), jacking plate in the front and rear diff. I'm curious though if there are any good places for the Jack stands other than the pinch welds. My Jack stands don't work well with pinch welds.

Anything unusual to look forward to or anything I should buy in addition to the pads and rotors (boots, brackets, misc hardware)?

Thanks for any tips/guidance you may have for me.
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Old 03-07-2016, 09:38 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I put the jack stands sideways (running length-wise) near the pinch weld. They feel sturdy to me there.

See the other thread about what brake lube to use to keep the boots in good health.

Good time to replace brake fluid.
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Old 03-07-2016, 10:01 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdelker View Post
I put the jack stands sideways (running length-wise) near the pinch weld. They feel sturdy to me there.

See the other thread about what brake lube to use to keep the boots in good health.

Good time to replace brake fluid.
That's pretty much where I put the stands on my Forester as well.

What is the other thread? I suppose I could do a search...
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Old 03-07-2016, 10:09 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I also use the pinch welds, but I set them perpendicular.

Other threads on the grease here: OEM or aftermarket
http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/...e-2013-ob.html

FWIW - Several years ago the pins got stuck on my wife's Forester and caused a whole mess of problems; I too have been tossing the bushings ever since.
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Old 03-07-2016, 09:48 PM   #5 (permalink)
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The oem pad kit comes with a packet of never seize, some anti squeal paste and multiple shields/plates.

I think the rear pads had an odd rattle spring on the passenger outboard pad...take note as you remove the old pads.
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Old 08-01-2017, 05:31 AM   #6 (permalink)
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A friend of mine told me than on the rear pads there is usually a kind of regulation to do after replacement, which is not strait-forward for non-professionals.
Do anyone have experience about it?
I would like to replace them by myself, but it would be the first time I do such a thing, on any car at all.
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Old 08-01-2017, 05:59 AM   #7 (permalink)
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its not difficult, he was probably talking about parking brake.
once you get the rotor off, you will see another set of brake shoes inside it will have an adjuster at the bottom, its a gear looking thing, if you unscrew them the shoes expand, if you screw in it will make shoes move in, this could be adjusted after the rotor is on, thru a small service hole.

here is a good video on hoe to change the rotors
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWU8lB45TW8
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Old 08-01-2017, 09:07 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Just a standard drum brake adjuster. Loosen the cable, spread the shoes till they touch the drum, then back off 3-4 clicks, then tighten the cable to specifications. The job isn't as straightforward on vehicles with electronic parking brakes, but usually there's still a way to do it yourself.
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Old 09-09-2017, 12:59 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Question Akebono front set includes only one packet, "Moly Brake Lube".

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Originally Posted by Thomasmryan View Post
The oem pad kit comes with a packet of never seize, some anti squeal paste, and multiple shields/plates.
Per my title: My set of Akebono front pads includes only one packet. Is it supposed to do both jobs? (anti-squeal on the shims, anti-seize on the bolts/cables)? In a situation of possible overkill, I bought a jar of 3M 8945 anti-seize, and I also have some fresh Redline CV-2. Is CV-2 possibly superior to the Akebono lube for the purpose of "anti-squeal"?

If not, I'll use the Akebono supplied packet for anti-squeal, and the 3M jar for anti-seize on the cables and bolts.

(The front brake pads will be concurrent with Inner CV boot replacement on one axle - that's why I've got the jar of Redline available. I've also got a set of new plates and shims for the brake job, in case the existing ones are too worn or bashed up to clean and re-use.)

I'm going to be new at doing this job, and haven't watched any videos yet. Brake pads only, the Rotors don't need to come off - unless inspection reveals craks in an outer CV boot as well. But I'll be starting at least 1 week away from today, so I have plenty of time to learn. And the CV boot replacement looks like the harder part of the weekend, almost certainly requiring several beers to complete 'successfully'.

Last edited by rickst29; 09-09-2017 at 01:06 PM.
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Old 09-10-2017, 02:40 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MicBert View Post
A friend of mine told me than on the rear pads there is usually a kind of regulation to do after replacement, which is not strait-forward for non-professionals.
Do anyone have experience about it?
I would like to replace them by myself, but it would be the first time I do such a thing, on any car at all.
Buy oem. Follow the instructions given in the box. Pretty easy if you ask me. Nothing unusual except for the little metal pads they give you. Just follow the directions and you should be fine. Use all the liquid they give you as well.
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Old 10-10-2017, 04:09 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I changed my rear pads and rotors on my 2011 a couple of weeks ago and parking brake shoe's were stuck on one side. It took me some time to figure it out, after banging it with a mallet that Subaru has already accounted for this. On the rotor there's a small hole covered by a black rubber stopper. Once you remove that stopper and align it to the 6 o'clock position you'll be able to see the parking brake adjuster screw which you will either move up or down to loosen (sorry I just don't recall the direction, my vote is for up). This should release the pads from the rotor but in my case they we're really stuck and needed some more convincing. If you're in this predicament, have a look inside that little hole and slowly spinning the rotor. At some point you'll notice the shoes have these metal notches cut into them where you can stick your flat head in and separate them from the rotor. Now this is assuming you're changing the rotors and/or parking brake shoes. The other thing that came in handy and this applied to the front brakes as well is a 14mm by 2" (I hope that's right, google to be sure) bolt that can be screwed into the side of the rotor to help separate it from the axle.

Good Luck
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:05 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I didn't enjoy the job. Both front sliders were stuck in my case. I had to use map gas on the caliper to get them out. They shot out like bullets with heat. For anyone doing this job, I'd suggest not using petroleum based grease on those front sliders, especially the one with rubber which will swell up and get stuck.

I didn't understand that the sliders were supposed to move on my Forester after doing a break job and actually broke the entire rotor while driving!
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:41 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Learning is expensive! But now you know now, you need to recoup that investment by doing all your own brake jobs, and your kids. And your friends
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:51 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdelker View Post
Learning is expensive! But now you know now, you need to recoup that investment by doing all your own brake jobs, and your kids. And your friends
I have been doing brake jobs for a long long time now. It's just that I am someone who doesn't learn quickly. Fortunately the mfg gave me a set of even beefier drilled/slotted rotors for the FXT after sending them a picture of happened. I didn't realize that it was the sliders all along until afterwards.

Suffice it to say, that was nice of them.

I use this stuff every time I do brakes these days. Definitely overkill, but I consider the alternative of having to torch out a stuck slider at best and purchase a new caliper at worst!

Permatex 24125 Ceramic Extreme Brake Parts Lubricant 8 fl. oz. brush-top bottle
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